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Replacement of working age population

replacement of working age poulation in non-metro Canada


Since 2008 in non-metro Canada, the number of potential individuals entering the workforce has been less than the potential retirees.  

  • At the Canada level (i.e. for metro plus non-metro), this is projected to continue until about 2025. 
  • The non-metro policy objective 18 years ago should have been "create people, not jobs!" 
  • Now, the non-metro challenge is to attract individuals from metro or to attract immigrants in order to maintain employment levels. Or, encourage potential retirees to keep working!

Metro refers to residents of Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs). CMAs have 50,000 or more in the built-up core (100,000 or more prior to 2006) and includes all neighbouring towns and municipalities where 50 percent or more of the workforce commutes to the built-up core.

Non-metro refers to the residents outside CMAs.

  • Census Agglomerations (CAs) in 2006 and 2011 have a built-up core of 10,000 or more with a total population of less than 100,000 and includes all neighbouring towns and municipalities where 50 percent or more of the workforce commutes to the built-up core (prior to 2006, a few CAs had a total population over 100,000 if they had less than 100,000 in the built-up core - due to the different definition of a CMA prior to 2006).
  • Metropolitan Influenced Zones (MIZ) are assigned on the basis of the share of the workforce that commutes to any CMA or CA (Strong MIZ: 30 to 49 percent; Moderate MIZ: 5 to 29 percent; Weak MIZ: 1 to 5 percent; No MIZ: no commuters).

 

 

Page Updated: 30/04/2018