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Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program

Overview and eligibility: Climate and Asset Management Network

FCM's Climate and Asset Management Network helps Canadian municipalities better integrate climate change and sustainability goals into decision-making about infrastructure assets and services, such as roads, drinking water and sanitation. We provide a combination of peer learning opportunities, grant funding of up to $175,000 and training.

On this page, learn more about the format, eligible initiatives, available funding, who can apply and how to apply.

Overview

The Climate and Asset Management Network provides a combination of peer learning opportunities, funding and training activities that occur in two phases.

In Phase 1, participants develop or refresh an asset management policy, strategy and governance framework to align with their climate action and other social, economic and environmental sustainability goals.

All participants take part in this phase, and will:

  • Receive a grant to develop or refresh an asset management policy, strategy and governance framework.
  • Take part in training and learning opportunities with participants from 10 to 15 other municipalities from across Canada.
  • Become part of a network of municipalities sharing knowledge about innovative asset management practices. 

Learn more about Phase 1

In Phase 2, municipalities may undertake a project to strengthen certain elements of asset management analysis and decision-making, while integrating climate risks and other sustainability considerations.

This phase is optional, and participants will:

  • Receive a grant to for eligible projects.
  • Benefit from opportunities to strengthen specific aspects of asset management planning to better incorporate climate risks and environmental, social and economic sustainability considerations.  

Learn more about Phase 2

Funding available

  • Grant funding of up to $175,000 (combined funding for phases 1 and 2)

Who can apply

The Climate and Asset Management Network is open to municipal governments of all sizes across Canada.

This initiative is designed for municipalities that have a strong commitment to climate action and want to integrate climate change goals into their asset management planning.

Prerequisites

To participate, municipalities must meet the following prerequisites:

  • Demonstrated financial and management capacity to undertake the Phase 1 project.
  • A council resolution (or a letter of intent to obtain a council resolution) to undertake program activities.
  • Commitment to involving a cross-departmental project team that includes, at minimum:

    • A capital planner (public works engineer or civil engineering technician or equivalent).
    • A strategic corporate or land use planner or administrator (e.g. a sustainability coordinator or staff responsible for developing and implementing climate mitigation or adaptation plans, director or CAO).
    • A finance director or equivalent.
  • Demonstrated progress in implementing a municipal integrated community sustainability plan or equivalent corporate sustainability plan.
  • Commitment to climate action as demonstrated through a council resolution, plan or policy addressing climate adaptation or mitigation.

Call for applications is now closed

Contact Donna Chiarelli, Senior Advisor, Knowledge Services, for information about this program.

Please note: Programming is currently offered in English only. Programming will be offered in French in the future.

Detailed description of Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities

Phase 1: Asset management policy, strategy and governance framework

Timeframe: 12 to 18 months

All members participate in this phase. During Phase 1, you will develop or refresh an asset management policy, strategy and governance framework for your municipality that:

  • Aligns with the municipality's strategic goals.
  • Integrates with the municipality's sustainability and environmental goals.
  • Integrates climate risks and considerations.
  • Uses and builds on a common philosophy, language and guiding principles developed for the program.

Projects are intended to enable your local government to take a municipality-wide approach to asset management.

Training and learning activities

During Phase 1, you will participate in learning opportunities and benefit from collaborating and sharing knowledge with your peers in the program.

  • Participating municipalities will work together with a high degree of collaboration and peer support.
  • Peer learning and training will include two face-to-face meetings, plus regular web meetings.
  • Timing and content of learning opportunities will be tailored to participants' needs and interests.
  • Travel expenses to attend meetings are eligible to be reimbursed through the Phase 1 project grant. 

Phase 2:  Risk assessment, levels of service or lifecycle management projects

Phase 2 is optional and is intended for municipalities that would like to strengthen specific aspects of asset management planning to better incorporate climate risks and environmental, social and economic sustainability considerations. 
 
Timeframe: 9 to 18 months (can be concurrent with Phase 1)

Eligible initiatives

Participants can apply for funding for one of the following types of Phase 2 initiatives:

You must ensure your Phase 2 project is aligned with the asset management policy, strategy and governance framework that you developed in Phase 1.

Municipalities that are not ready to undertake a Phase 2 project when they apply to the Climate and Asset Management Network can apply for Phase 2 at any time during implementation or after completion of their Phase 1 project. 

1. Levels of service projects

Eligible projects must develop or strengthen the municipality's levels of service measures and:

  • Align with the Phase 1 strategy, policy and governance framework.
  • Incorporate climate risks and considerations and align with the municipality's other sustainability goals.
  • Include Customer Levels of Service indicators that measure the actual service received by customers, the environment and other stakeholders.
  • Incorporate a solid methodology, such as the seven universal customer values for service: sustainability, accessibility, availability/reliability, quality, customer service, safety and legislation.

  Examples include projects that:

  • Develop or refresh a levels of service (LOS) framework and LOS measures that address climate risks and other sustainability considerations (basic or advanced).
  • Improve understanding of the impact of changing levels of service, in particular the financial impact of addressing climate risks and achieving other sustainability goals in shorter timeframes (basic or advanced).
  • Conduct stakeholder consultation on proposed LOS measures and current performance (advanced), that include climate considerations.
  • Forecast long-term service implications resulting from internal changes (e.g. funding, staffing, policy) and external changes (e.g. demographics, climate, technology), (advanced).

2. Risk assessment projects

Eligible projects aim to develop or strengthen the municipality's risk management practices and:

  • Align with corporate sustainability goals.
  • Include a comprehensive consequence matrix that explicitly balances the different impacts on stakeholders, including climate risks and impacts.
  • Incorporate a solid risk management methodology.

  Examples include projects that:

  • Develop a basic risk management framework that includes climate risks assessment, and conduct risk assessments on routine asset issues, such as end-of-life failure.
  • Build risk-based decision making into investment planning that includes climate risks, and prioritize processes to develop good practices for communicating risk management.
  • Conduct risk assessments and develop mitigation strategies for climate change and the impact of extreme weather events.
  • Identify and evaluate longer-term asset vulnerability due to all risks (including climate and other environmental risks) and relate them to levels of service and asset renewal strategies. 

3. Lifecycle management projects

Eligible projects seek to develop or strengthen the municipality's lifecycle management practices and:

  • Align with corporate sustainability and climate-related goals.
  • Incorporate the full lifecycle cost of assets and clearly show how climate risks and other environmental sustainability considerations are built into the lifecycle cost assessment.
  • Use solid methodologies for asset lifecycle assessment.

  Examples include projects that:

  • Implement lifecycle cost analysis in investment decision-making processes.
  • Implement lifecycle and triple bottom line assessments or related methodology in investment decision-making processes, where environmental cost, including climate impacts may be monetized.
  • Develop good practices for communicating lifecycle cost or triple bottom line analyses to senior decision makers to improve awareness of the long-term impact of investment decisions, particularly in addressing climate risks and meeting other environmental sustainability goals where examples or supporting evidence are provided and used as benchmarks.
  • Explore the transition toward low-carbon municipal service delivery through carbon calculators in investment decision making.

More funding and training for asset management and climate change

If your community is at an early stage of incorporating asset management into infrastructure planning, you can also apply for funding and learn more about learning and training opportunities through FCM's Municipal Asset Management Program. Other funding options for climate change and asset management are also available through the Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program.


The Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program is a new five-year, $75-million program designed to encourage Canadian municipalities to better prepare for and adapt to the new realities of climate change as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The program is delivered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and funded by the Government of Canada.
Page Updated: 23/06/2017