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Green Municipal Fund

Water Bylaws

Find out how more and more Canadian municipalities are sustainably managing this precious resource in our ever-growing Municipal Sustainable Bylaw Collection.

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    Secondary Dyke Bylaw (2000)

    The City of Winnipeg Secondary Dyke Bylaw 7600/2000 designates secondary dyke corridors and regulates construction within those corridors to protect riverside properties. These flood protection infrastructures must be built between primary dykes and designated river and creek channels. 
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    Surface Water Management Plan Bylaw (2010)

    The Surface Water Management Plan Bylaw No. 1606 regulates and requires the disposal of surface water and stormwater runoff. 
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    Green Roof Bylaw (2009)

    The City of Toronto Green Roof Bylaw requires all new developments over 2,000 square metres to include a green roof with coverage of available roof space ranging from 20 to 60 per cent. The bylaw applies to all new residential, commercial and institutional building permit applications made after January 31, 2010, and to all new industrial development applications after January 31, 2011.
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    Règlement concernant la vidange des fosses septiques (2009)

    (Available in original language) The Township of Orford Bylaw 839 aims to develop and regulate septic tank services. With the exception of residences or commercial buildings inaccessible by land, the bylaw stipulates that the township will check sludge and scum depth annually to determine cleaning frequency.
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    Règlement sur la protection des berges et du milieu aquatique (2008)

    (Available in original language) The Municipality of Saint-Adolphe d’Howard Bylaw 535-2 regulates access to and protection of shorelines, and nautical security on Saint-Joseph and Sainte-Marie lakes. This bylaw replaces Bylaw 535-2 (2006) and is linked to the watershed agreement between the municipality and the Rivière du Nord watershed agency (Abrinord). 
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    Subdivision and Development Bylaw (2005)

    The District of Lantzville Subdivision and Development Bylaw 55.2 was amended in 2008 and incorporates low-impact development standards for roads and stormwater management, as well as alternatives for impervious surfaces. As part of the Regional District of Nanaimo, the District of Lantzville wants to ensure that future growth adheres to high regional environmental standards.
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    Sewers Bylaw Amendment (2007)

    The City of Edmonton Bylaw 14336 Sewers Bylaw Amendment 11 requires dental offices to install amalgam separators. These separators remove 95 per cent of the mercury contained in dental waste, preventing it from entering the sewer system. 
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    Water Utility Bylaw (2006)

    The City of Calgary’s Water Utility Bylaw (40M2006) requires all residential customers in Calgary to use water meters for billing purposes by 2014 and requires all new homes and commercial construction, including renovations that require a plumbing permit, to install low water-use fixtures. The bylaw incorporates elements of the previous municipal Water Meter Bylaw (2002) and Low Water-Use Fixture Bylaw (2005), and includes a list of meter rates and fees.
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    Politique pour une gestion durable de l’eau (2005)

    (Available in original language) The Town of Thetford Mines Sustainable Water Management Policy covers four main activities: management of drinking water consumption, continued cleanup and improvement of wastewater management, protection of water quality and water systems, and promotion of tourist and recreational aquatic activities. The policy includes proposed measures and an implementation plan for each activity.
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    Règlement concernant l’interdiction d’utilisation des fertilisants et pesticides (2004)

    (Available in original language) The Town of Mount-Tremblant Bylaw (2004)-67 bans the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Pesticides are banned on town properties, with some exceptions identified in the bylaw. Fertilizer use is banned within 100 metres of the shoreline of a lake or waterway. Organic fertilizers are also banned within 15 metres of the shoreline. 
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    Règlement concernant l’utilisation de l’eau potable et la mise en place de compteurs d’eau (2004)

    (Available in original language) The Town of Mont-Tremblant Bylaw (2004)-63 governs the use of drinking water and the installation of water meters in the town of Mont-Tremblant. The bylaw places restrictions on lawn-watering, bans the washing of driveways with drinking water, and bans the use of drinking water to melt snow or ice. Watering is also prohibited during rainfall and all automatic watering systems must be shut off. All industrial and commercial buildings that use water to conduct business must install water meters. Appendix B of the bylaw provides a list of businesses, industries and activities subject to water meter installation.
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    Pesticide Bylaw (2003)

    The City of Toronto Bylaw 456-2003 regulates pesticide use within the Greater Toronto Area to protect the health, well-being and safety of its residents. The Ontario Cosmetic Pesticides Ban (2009) now supersedes Bylaw 456-2003 except where the bylaw is stricter. 
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    Pesticide Bylaw (2000)

    The Halifax Regional Municipality Bylaw P-800 regulates the use of pesticides, herbicides and insecticides. The bylaw was implemented over a four-year period, starting with a ban on the cosmetic use of pesticides on municipal property and the launch of public awareness programs in the first year, and culminating in a general ban on the cosmetic use of pesticides on all properties in the fourth year. 
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    Sewer Use Bylaw (2000)

    The City of Toronto Bylaw 457-2000 regulates the discharge of sewage and land drainage to cut toxic waste. The bylaw targets industries with poor toxic waste disposal habits by placing strict limits on 38 otherwise unrestricted chemicals. These regulations also aim to reduce the amount of toxic fume emissions as industries use fewer toxic compounds and reduce their disposal of hazardous liquids and solid waste.