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Green Municipal Fund

Municipalities in the Leadership in Asset Management Program

Municipalities lead the way and integrate environmental goals into asset management practices

Meet the 12 municipalities selected to receive grants and participate in the English cohort of FCM's Leadership in Asset Management Program (LAMP) in 2015–2017.

The program enables municipalities to strengthen their approach to managing infrastructure that provides community services, such as transportation, drinking water and sanitation, and to integrate sustainability goals. Municipalities of all sizes from across Canada work together and learn from each other as they develop asset management policies and strategies that integrate sustainability and environmental considerations.

FCM's Leadership in Asset Management Program is offered in partnership with the Canadian Network of Asset Managers.

SEE ALSO: Government of Canada and FCM fund 12 leading communities in strategic asset management initiative (news release)

Municipalities in the 2015–2017 English cohort

As part of the program, all members complete the core project in Phase 1, which is to create an asset management strategy. Members also have the option to undertake an additional project in Phase 2 to strengthen specific elements of their asset management strategy related to levels of service, lifecycle management or risk assessment.

City of Airdrie, AB

Airdrie’s Chinook Park wind-powered LED lights

City of Airdrie, AB

Population: 54,891

Grant: $175,000

Phases 1 and 2

Lynda Phelan, Team Leader, Communications

The City of Airdrie will undertake a unique Phase 2 project to strengthen and operationalize its asset management system by better integrating levels of service and risk and lifecycle management. Airdrie has already been liaising with other mid-sized cities in Alberta regarding its approach and will share with them and other municipalities the resources it develops as it progresses. Through the program, Airdrie will exercise leadership and act as a mentor to other municipalities.

Municipality of the County of Kings, NS

Waterville sewer and treatment plant in Kings County

Municipality of the County of Kings, NS

Population: 60,000

Grant: $32,500

Phase 1

Scott Quinn, Manager, Engineering and Public Works, Land and Parks Services

Kings County Council and staff have identified the need for a more formal asset management policy and approach and are building internal capacity toward this goal. By participating in the program, Kings County will be able to develop and accelerate its asset management capacity sooner than if it continued on its own. In the process, it will become a leader in the province in adopting asset management as a strategic business process.

City of Edmonton, AB

Fort Edmonton foot bridge

City of Edmonton, AB

Population: 877,926

Grant: $150,000

Phases 1 and 2

John Pater, Senior Communications Advisor, Financial Services and Utilities

Edmonton is a recognized leader in municipal asset management and is the only LAMP applicant to focus a Phase 2 project on strengthening the city's risk assessment decision-making framework. During the project, the city will re-evaluate, strengthen and ensure consistency on how it applies a risk assessment matrix for decision-making across all business units. Known as the Risk Assessment Framework Tool (RAFT) project, it will help the city rank its infrastructure rehabilitation needs and determine how to allocate funds optimally across its various infrastructure assets to ensure long-term value. This project will see Edmonton continue its role as an innovator in asset management in Canada.

City of Fredericton, NB

A view of Fredericton's picturesque St. John River

City of Fredericton, NB

Population: 57,000

Grant: $49,775

Phases 1 and 2

Adam Bell, Financial Reporting, Accounting Manager

Fredericton is a leader in asset management in Atlantic Canada and a great example of a city that is participating in LAMP in order to look beyond the financial sustainability of its infrastructure assets and integrate environmental and social considerations. For its Phase 2 project, Fredericton will develop advanced service-oriented asset management practices in its Engineering and Operations Department and pilot a rollout of those techniques and practices through its Parks and Trees Division — a unique contribution that can be replicated in other communities across the country.

Township of Langley, BC

Municipality logo

Township of Langley, BC

Population: 106,000

Grant: $32,500

Phases 1

Erin Brocklehurst, Corporate Media Liaison, Corporate Administration Division

The Township of Langley has made considerable progress implementing sustainability initiatives guided by its Sustainability Charter. The township is participating in Phase 1 of LAMP so that it can better align its existing asset management policy and practices with its sustainability goals. Langley will be a role model for other sustainable communities that are already practicing asset management and want to continue to progress.

City of Melville, SK

Municipality logo

City of Melville, SK

Population: 4,500

Grant: $32,500

Phase 1

Andrew Fahlman, Public Works Manager, Public Works

The City of Melville is a small rural community in Saskatchewan that has demonstrated a strong political commitment and desire to make progress in its approach to asset management. By participating in Phase 1 of the program, Melville has the potential to become a leader in this area and a mentor to other small communities in the Prairies and across Canada.

City of Nanaimo, BC

Municipality logo

City of Nanaimo, BC

Population: 83,810

Grant: $175,000

Phases 1 and 2

Geoff Goodall, Director Engineering and Public Works, Public Works Department

The City of Nanaimo manages assets with a value of about $2.2 billion and, since 2010, has demonstrated a leadership role in asset management. As part of its Phase 2 project, the city will develop and pilot a "levels of service" approach for its transportation services, taking into account sustainability goals and costs. The project also includes an innovative public engagement component that will collect information on citizen and stakeholder experiences regarding the levels of service approach. Nanaimo aims to replicate this exercise for other city services such as water, sewer and stormwater management.

Municipality of North Grenville, ON

Municipality logo

Municipality of North Grenville, ON

Population: 15,000

Grant: $94,100

Phases 1 and 2

Karen Dunlop, Director of Public Works

North Grenville's Phase 2 project aims to incorporate lifecycle management for two types of assets not currently included in its asset management program: fleet and facilities. This municipality will develop a detailed lifecycle analysis and management strategies to maintain and fund these assets over their useful life as they age and need to be replaced. The municipality also plans to integrate asset management software to help with annual reporting of performance measures and results. North Grenville's contribution to LAMP will be useful for other communities that want to strengthen decision-making through improved lifecycle management, especially regarding fleet and facilities. 

City of Ottawa, ON

Municipality logo

City of Ottawa, ON

Population: 933,000

Grant: $120,000

Phases 1 and 2

Jocelyne Turner, Corporate Communications Specialist, City Manager's Office

The City of Ottawa is a recognized leader in asset management and will be a strong mentor to other LAMP participants. In its Phase 2 project, Ottawa will use improved lifecycle management processes to strengthen decision-making in managing its infrastructure assets. The city aims to improve its existing lifecycle costing tools in order to refine and put into practice the city's existing framework for prioritizing capital investments. The city also aims to improve data and information gathering during a project's entire life cycle from initiation through to commissioning. The experiences and lessons learned from Ottawa's project will be especially useful to other cities in Canada.

City of Revelstoke, BC

Grizzly Plaza, Revelstoke’s outdoor meeting and arts centre

City of Revelstoke, BC

Population: 7,139

Grant: $69,960

Phases 1 and 2

Dawn Levesque, Director of Corporate Administration

In its Phase 2 project, the small city of Revelstoke will develop a basic "levels of service" framework that will focus on customer and technical considerations. It will also develop costing for these levels of service and develop a community engagement survey framework for two or three asset classes. The city aims to be able to replicate these processes for other departments in the future. The results of Revelstoke's Phase 1 and 2 LAMP projects will likely be of interest to many other small communities in Canada.

City of Vancouver, BC

The Burrard Bridge Upgrade project

City of Vancouver, BC

Population: 605,000

Grant: $32,500

Phase 1

Tobin Postma, Communications Manager, Communications Department

Vancouver is consistently ranked one of the most livable and greenest cities in the world. Vancouver's infrastructure has reached the stage where major lifecycle rehabilitation and renewal is required. The city must strike a careful balance between infrastructure renewal and expansion to address population growth. In 2010, Vancouver embarked on a review of its capital program and developed a strategic decision-making framework to guide capital investments and service delivery. Through its participation in Phase 1, the city hopes to improve how it integrates sustainability objectives from its Greenest City 2020 Action Plan into its 10-year Capital Strategic Outlook and 4-year Capital Plan.

City of Windsor, ON

Municipality logo

City of Windsor, ON

Population: 209,000

Grant: $65,000

Phases 1 and 2

Melissa Osborne, Senior Manager of Asset Planning Department: Asset Planning / Finance

Jason Moore, Senior Manager of Communications and Customer Service, Communications and Customer Service

Windsor's Phase 2 project will help develop standardized methodologies and tools for lifecycle costing across all the city's asset categories. The solutions will need to be comprehensive and replicable, and take into account a number of factors: the intended design life of each asset; operation and maintenance costs; energy and environmental impacts; various rehabilitation options; net present value; and capital cost. The resulting information will be tied to the city's levels of service, risk processes and long-term funding forecasts to assist with prioritization.

Contact information for news media

For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact:
Maurice Gingues
Media Relations Advisor, Green Municipal Fund
T. 613-907-6399

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Page Updated: 01/04/2016