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Climate Change and Resiliency

The Issue

Climate Change and Resiliency

We've all witnessed the dramatic rise in weather-related emergences in Canada-from flooding and ice storms to forest fires. These former once-in-a-century events now happen with greater frequency; displacing families, damaging property and causing significant economic disruption. It's more important than ever to assess the risks of climate change, prepare infrastructure and ensure that communities are ready when disaster strikes. 

Municipalities are frontline stewards of the environment. They're already innovating to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while investing in sustainable infrastructure and renewable energy. Local governments are ready to work together to meet the challenges of climate change, protect families and ensure that our communities are resilient for generations to come.

Working in partnership with the municipal sector, the federal government must:

  • Increase the amount of dedicated federal investments in local green infrastructure towards both adaptation and mitigation goals. These investments include things like transit, building retrofits and greater efficiency in water and waste water management, through predictable, long-term mechanisms like the federal Gas Tax Fund.
  • Find ways to enable large-scale strategic green projects that cannot be funded through an allocation model alone.
  • Ensure the central role local governments are clearly included in the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, reflecting their role in climate change mitigation and adaptation.
  • Provide incentives and support for municipal energy-efficient building retrofits, eco-energy retrofits and other proven greenhouse gas reduction initiatives.
  • Work with municipal experts to empower communities of all sizes with the capacity they need to predict, prepare for and respond to weather-related emergencies.
  • Engage local governments on expanding national disaster mitigation strategies to cover the full spectrum of climate change impacts, including droughts and forest fires.

 

FCM Resources

Climate Change

Climate Change and Resiliency
The first 100 days of government

COP21

COP21

Climate Change Adaptation

Climate Change Adaptation

Partners for Climate Protection

Partners for Climate Protection

The Green Economy

The Green Economy

Federal Assessment Processes

Federal Assessment Processes 

 

 

Quick Facts

About 50%



The amount of Canada's GHG emissions that local governments have influence over.

Between 20 and 55 megatonnes



The potential amount of GHG reductions that Canada's cities and communities can supply using proven strategies and technologies.

$5 billion



The average annual cost of extreme weather events by 2020. That number will rise to $43 billion per year by 2050.

$9-$38



The amount of money saved in future damages for every dollar invested today in climate change adaptation.

Page Updated: 14/09/2016